Gary M. Marsh

University of Pittsburgh, USA 0000-0002-2509-0490

Gary M. Marsh was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, USA in 1952. He received his B.S. degree in mathematics (cum laude) in 1973 from the University of Pittsburgh, Pa, USA and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biostatistics in 1974 and 1977 from the Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH), University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Marsh is a Professor of biostatistics, epidemiology, and clinical and translational science, and the Director of the Center for Occupational Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh. His main interests are occupational/environmental biostatistics and epidemiology, quantitative risk assessment, and statistical computing. He conducts occupational epidemiological studies to investigate the long-term health effects of exposure to such agents as man-made mineral fibers, formaldehyde, acrylamide, acrylonitrile, arsenic, chloroprene, tungsten carbide, petrochemicals, aromatic amines, and pharmaceuticals. He also conducts environmental epidemiologic studies of communities exposed to industrial pollutants and does basic methodological research related to longitudinal data analysis and quantitative risk assessment. He is a Fellow at the American College of Epidemiology and a senior author of the computer software package: Occupational Cohort Mortality Analysis Program (OCMAP) and a developer of the Mortality and Population Data System (MPDS). He has served as a Member of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Safety and Occupational Health Study Section, the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine Committee to Evaluate the Health Consequences of the Persian Gulf War, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Working Group to evaluate the carcinogenicity of man-made vitreous fibers, and the US Environmental Protection Agency, Science Advisory Board, Asbestos Panel.

Biography Updated on 31 October 2010

Scholarly Contributions [Data Provided by scopus]

download