Richard L. Doty

University of Pennsylvania, USA

Richard L. Doty is the Director of the University of Pennsylvania's Smell and Taste Center, Philadelphia, Pa, USA and Professor within the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the same institution. He received his B.S. degree from the Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo, USA in 1966, his M.A. degree in conjunction with NASA's Ames Research Center from the California State University, San Jose, Calif, USA in 1968, and his Ph.D. degree in comparative psychology from the Michigan State University in 1971. He was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, Calif, USA from 1971 to 1973. He is an editorial consultant to over 50 scientific and medical journals and to dozens of major corporations and governmental advisory committees and author or coauthor of over 350 professional publications (including 10 books). His most recent books are the Neurology of Olfaction (Cambridge University Press, 2009), with Christopher Hawkes, and The Great Pheromone Myth (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010). Doty is well known for having invented the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, the world's first standardized olfactory test. Dr. Doty is the recipient of numerous awards, including a James A. Shannon Award from the National Institutes of Health (1996), the Olfactory Research Fund's Scientific Sense of Smell Award (2000), the William Osler Patient-Oriented Research Award from the University of Pennsylvania (2003), the Association for Chemoreception Science's Max Mozell Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Chemical Senses (2005), and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Colorado State University (2007). He is an elected Fellow of the College of Physicians and Surgeons (1983), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2005), the Royal College of Medicine (2008), and the Association for Psychological Science (2009).

Biography Updated on 20 March 2011

Scholarly Contributions [Data Provided by scopus]

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