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Abstract and Applied Analysis
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 405739, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/405739
Research Article

A Novel Chaotic Neural Network Using Memristive Synapse with Applications in Associative Memory

1School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
2Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 22 September 2012; Accepted 1 November 2012

Academic Editor: Chuandong Li

Copyright © 2012 Xiaofang Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Chaotic Neural Network, also denoted by the acronym CNN, has rich dynamical behaviors that can be harnessed in promising engineering applications. However, due to its complex synapse learning rules and network structure, it is difficult to update its synaptic weights quickly and implement its large scale physical circuit. This paper addresses an implementation scheme of a novel CNN with memristive neural synapses that may provide a feasible solution for further development of CNN. Memristor, widely known as the fourth fundamental circuit element, was theoretically predicted by Chua in 1971 and has been developed in 2008 by the researchers in Hewlett-Packard Laboratory. Memristor based hybrid nanoscale CMOS technology is expected to revolutionize the digital and neuromorphic computation. The proposed memristive CNN has four significant features: (1) nanoscale memristors can simplify the synaptic circuit greatly and enable the synaptic weights update easily; (2) it can separate stored patterns from superimposed input; (3) it can deal with one-to-many associative memory; (4) it can deal with many-to-many associative memory. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.