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Advances in Artificial Intelligence
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 841646, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/841646
Research Article

Selection for Reinforcement-Free Learning Ability as an Organizing Factor in the Evolution of Cognition

Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan

Received 28 August 2012; Revised 21 January 2013; Accepted 5 February 2013

Academic Editor: Bikramjit Banerjee

Copyright © 2013 Solvi Arnold et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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