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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 632172, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/632172
Research Article

Suppression of Bromus tectorum L. by Established Perennial Grasses: Potential Mechanisms—Part One

USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, 920 Valley Road, Reno, NV 89512, USA

Received 29 March 2012; Revised 30 May 2012; Accepted 6 June 2012

Academic Editor: D. L. Jones

Copyright © 2012 Robert R. Blank and Tye Morgan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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