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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 631619, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/631619
Research Article

Phytoremediation of Lead Polluted Soil by Glycine max L.

Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, PMB 65, Minna 920281, Nigeria

Received 17 July 2013; Revised 13 September 2013; Accepted 16 September 2013

Academic Editor: Yong Sik Ok

Copyright © 2013 Sesan Abiodun Aransiola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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