About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 924891, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/924891
Research Article

The Solid Phase Distribution and Bioaccessibility of Arsenic, Chromium, and Nickel in Natural Ironstone Soils in the UK

1British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK
2Cherwell District Council 2013 Bodicote House, Bodicote, Banbury OX15 4AA, UK

Received 26 July 2013; Revised 19 December 2013; Accepted 27 January 2014; Published 5 March 2014

Academic Editor: Balwant Singh

Copyright © 2014 Joanna Wragg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. Environment Agency, Human Health Toxicological Assessment of Contaminants in Soil, Environment Agency (England and Wales), Bristol, UK, 2009.
  2. C. P. Nathanail, C. McCaffrey, M. R. Ashmore et al., The LQM/CIEH Generic Assessment Criteria for Human Health Risk Assessment, Land Quality Press, Nottingham, UK, 2009.
  3. A. Kabata-Pendias and A. B. Mukherjee, Trace Elements From Soil to Human, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2007.
  4. P. L. Smedley and D. G. Kinniburgh, “A review of the source, behaviour and distribution of arsenic in natural waters,” Applied Geochemistry, vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 517–568, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. B. G. Rawlins, S. P. McGrath, A. J. Scheib et al., The Advanced Soil Geochemical Atlas of England and Wales, British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK, 2012.
  6. S. P. McGrath, “Nickel,” in Heavy Metals in Soils, B. J. Alloway, Ed., Blackie Academic & Professional, London, UK, 1995.
  7. E. L. Ander, C. C. Johnson, M. R. Cave, B. Palumbo-Roe, C. P. Nathanail, and R. M. Lark, “Methodology for the determination of normal background concentrations of contaminants in English soil,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 454-455, pp. 604–618, 2013.
  8. M. Cave, H. Taylor, and J. Wragg, “Estimation of the bioaccessible arsenic fraction in soils using near infrared spectroscopy,” Journal of Environmental Science and Health A, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 1293–1301, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. R. Cave, J. Wragg, B. Palumbo, and B. A. Klinck, Measurement of the Bioaccessibility of Arsenic in UK Soils, Environment Agency, 2003.
  10. B. Palumbo-Roe, M. R. Cave, B. A. Klinck et al., “Bioaccessibility of arsenic in soils developed over Jurassic ironstones in eastern England,” Environmental Geochemistry and Health, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 121–130, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. Wragg, M. Cave, and P. Nathanail, “A study of the relationship between arsenic bioaccessibility and its solid-phase distribution in soils from Wellingborough, UK,” Journal of Environmental Science and Health A, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 1303–1315, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. M. R. Cave, J. Wragg, and H. Harrison, “Measurement modelling and mapping of arsenic bioaccessibility in Northampton, UK,” Journal of Environmental Science & Health Part A, vol. 48, pp. 629–640, 2013.
  13. D. J. Paustenbach, “The practice of exposure assessment: a state-of-the-art review (Reprinted from Principles and Methods of Toxicology, 4th edition, 2001),” Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health B, vol. 3, pp. 179–291, 2000.
  14. C. P. Nathanail and R. Smith, “Incorporating bioaccessibility in detailed quantitative human health risk assessments,” Journal of Environmental Science and Health A, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 1193–1202, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. J. H. Taylor, Petrology of the Northampton Sand and Ironstone Formation, Memoirs of the Geological Survey of Great Britain, 1949.
  16. C. C. Johnson, N. Breward, E. L. Ander, and L. Ault, “G-BASE: baseline geochemical mapping of Great Britain and Northern Ireland,” Geochemistry, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 347–357, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. J. Duggan, M. J. Inskip, S. A. Rundle, and J. S. Moorcroft, “Lead in playground dust and on the hands of schoolchildren,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 65–79, 1985. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. N. Ingham and B. A. R. Vrebos, “High productivity geochemical XRF analysis,” Advances in X-Ray Analysis, vol. 37, pp. 717–724, 1994.
  19. M. V. Ruby, A. Davis, R. Schoof, S. Eberle, and C. M. Sellstone, “Estimation of lead and arsenic bioavailability using a physiologically based extraction test,” Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 422–430, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. R. Cave, A. E. Milodowski, and E. N. Friel, “Evaluation of a method for identification of host physico-chemical phases for trace metals and measurement of their solid-phase partitioning in soil samples by nitric acid extraction and chemometric mixture resolution,” Geochemistry, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 71–86, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. R. Cave and J. Wragg, Determination of Major and Trace Cations in Aqueous Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (Varian/Vista), British Geological Survey, 2002.
  22. J. Wragg, A Study of the Relationship Between Arsenic Bioaccessibility and Its Solid Phase Distribution in Wellingborough Soils, Geography, Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, 2005.
  23. M. R. Cave, The Use of Self Modelling Mixture Resolution for the Interpretation of Geochemical Data, British Geological Survey, 2009.
  24. S. Cox, M. M. Chelliah, J. McKinley et al., “The importance of solid-phase distribution on the oral bioaccessibility of Ni and Cr in soils overlying Palaeogene basalt lavas, Northern Ireland,” Environmental Geochemistry and Health, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 553–567, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. R. R. Development Core Team, A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria, 2011.
  26. J. Wragg, BGS Guidance Material 102, Ironstone Soil, Certificate of Analysis, British Geological Survey, 2009.
  27. A. Broadway, M. R. Cave, J. Wragg et al., “Determination of the bioaccessibility of chromium in Glasgow soil and the implications for human health risk assessment,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 409, no. 2, pp. 267–277, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. J. Wragg, M. Cave, N. Basta et al., “An inter-laboratory trial of the unified BARGE bioaccessibility method for arsenic, cadmium and lead in soil,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 409, no. 19, pp. 4016–4030, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. N. Breward, “Arsenic and presumed resistate trace element geochemistry of the Lincolnshire (UK) sedimentary ironstones, as revealed by a regional geochemical survey using soil, water and stream sediment sampling,” Applied Geochemistry, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1970–1993, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. P. Nathanail, C. McCaffrey, R. Ogden, N. Foster, A. Gillett, and D. Haynes, “Uptake of arsenic by vegetables for human consumption: a study of Wellingborough allotment plots,” Land Contamination and Reclamation, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 219–238, 2004. View at Scopus
  31. J. Wragg and B. Klinck, “The bioaccessibility of lead from Welsh mine waste using a respiratory uptake test,” Journal of Environmental Science and Health A, vol. 42, no. 9, pp. 1223–1231, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. S. Denys, J. Caboche, K. Tack et al., “In Vivo validation of the unified barge method to assess the bioaccessibility of arsenic, antimony, cadmium, and lead in soils,” Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 46, pp. 6252–6260, 2012.
  33. J. D. Appleton, M. R. Cave, and J. Wragg, “Anthropogenic and geogenic impacts on arsenic bioaccessibility in UK topsoils,” Science of the Total Environment, vol. 435-436, pp. 21–29, 2012.
  34. J. Wragg and M. R. Cave, Methods for the Measurement of the Oral Bioaccessibility of Selected Metals and Metalloids in Soils: A Critical Review, Environment Agency, 2003.
  35. J. Wragg, M. R. Cave, H. Taylor et al., Inter-Laboratory Trial of a Unified Bioaccessibility Procedure, British Geological Survey, 2009.
  36. J. Wragg and M. Cave, “Assessment of a geochemical extraction procedure to determine the solid phase fractionation and bioaccessibility of potentially harmful elements in soils: a case study using the NIST 2710 reference soil,” Analytica Chimica Acta, vol. 722, pp. 43–54, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. M. Cave, The Use of Self Modelling Mixture Resolution Methods for the Interpretation of Geochemical Data Sets, British Geological Survey, 2008.
  38. R. Santamaría-Fernández, M. R. Cave, and S. J. Hill, “The effect of humic acids on the sequential extraction of metals in soils and sediments using ICP-AES and chemometric analysis,” Journal of Environmental Monitoring, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 929–934, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. J. R. Clark, “Enzyme-induced leaching of B-horizon soils for mineral exploration in areas of glacial overburden,” Transactions of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical B, vol. 102, pp. B19–B29, 1993.
  40. R. M. Cornell and U. Schwertmann, The Iron Oxides—Structure Properties, Reactions, Occurences and Uses, VCH Publishers, Weinheim, Germany, 1996.