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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 158487, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/158487
Research Article

Heart Rate Responses to Synthesized Affective Spoken Words

Research Group for Emotions, Sociality, and Computing, Tampere Unit for Computer-Human Interaction (TAUCHI), School of Information Sciences, University of Tampere, Kanslerinrinne 1, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Finland

Received 7 March 2012; Revised 20 June 2012; Accepted 5 July 2012

Academic Editor: Eva Cerezo

Copyright © 2012 Mirja Ilves and Veikko Surakka. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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