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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 389523, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/389523
Research Article

Interactive Language Learning through Speech-Enabled Virtual Scenarios

Centre for Communication Interface Research, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL, UK

Received 30 May 2012; Accepted 5 September 2012

Academic Editor: M. Carmen Juan

Copyright © 2012 Hazel Morton et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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