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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 598739, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/598739
Research Article

Evaluating User Response to In-Car Haptic Feedback Touchscreens Using the Lane Change Test

1WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
2Jaguar & Land Rover Research, Jaguar Land Rover, Coventry CV3 4LF, UK

Received 18 August 2011; Revised 19 March 2012; Accepted 5 April 2012

Academic Editor: Mark Dunlop

Copyright © 2012 Matthew J. Pitts et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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