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Advances in Human-Computer Interaction
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 831959, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/831959
Research Article

Psychophysiology to Assess Impact of Varying Levels of Simulation Fidelity in a Threat Environment

1Clinical Neuropsychology and Simulation (CNS) Lab, Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
2Institute for Creative Technologies, University of Southern California, Playa Vista, Los Angeles, CA 90094, USA
3Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA

Received 25 March 2012; Accepted 13 September 2012

Academic Editor: Pablo Moreno-Ger

Copyright © 2012 Thomas D. Parsons et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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