About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Advances in Mechanical Engineering
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 170590, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/170590
Editorial

Micro/Nanotransport Phenomena in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

1The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0325, USA
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
3Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA
4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA 02139, USA

Received 8 March 2010; Accepted 8 March 2010

Copyright © 2010 G. P. “Bud” Peterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


As a result of serious concerns about climate change, high oil prices, and peak oil, energy has become one of the most important issues of our time. Renewable energy and energy-saving technologies are potentially crucial parts of the ultimate solutions to both energy sustainability and climate change. The set of papers in this special issue of “Micro/nanotransport phenomena in renewable energy and energy efficiency” address some of the basic aspects of renewable energy harvest/conversion, emission control, and optimization of energy issues of today.

Contained herein, Vorobyev and Guo [1] develop a new method based on Femtosecond laser to fabricate high-quality metallic light absorbers. This method significantly enhances broadband absorption of electromagnetic radiation by creating a complex of nano- and microstructures. These artificially made surfaces can be used to improve the energy conversion efficiency such as thermophotovoltaics and solar energy absorbers. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies emerged as one of the most favorable solutions to diversity energy resources and to energy sustainability and environment. Fell cell technology is a significant component in this special issue. Topics include the experimental and numerical study of cold startup of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell [2], which is one of most promising solutions for the next generation of purely electric automobiles, development of a continuum model for water transport in the Ionomer-phase of catalyst-coated membranes for PEM [3], and mesoscopic modeling based on the lattice Boltzmann method for water management in fell cells [4]. Emission control is attracting more attention and is also addressed in this special issue. Nanosized cerium oxide particles as additives on biodiesel were found to appreciably reduce the emission levels of hydrocarbon and through enhancing hydrocarbon oxidation and promoting complete combustion [5]. Mesoscopic modeling of multiphysicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been found to be especially effective to model the dissolving process of supercritical CO2 into geologic formations such as limestone rock [4], which may provide a comprehensive numerical tool to simulate the long-term fate of CO2 after injection into the geologic formations. Thermal management is important to concentrated solar technology. Flat-plate oscillating heat pipes are shown to be capable of cooling photovoltaic cells with high concentration ratios because of their superior performance under high-heat flux conditions [6]. Nanoparticles can be used to improve the convective heat transfer at high Reynolds number [7]. The optimization of energy in the end use is included in this special issue since it is important to energy sustainability and the environment. The “field synergy principle” proposed by Guo (see [811]) is illustrated to be an effective tool to optimize the energy and mass flow in energy system [12].

G. P. “Bud” Peterson
Chen Li
MoranWang
Gang Chen

References

  1. A. Y. Vorobyev and C. L. Guo, “Metallic light absorbers produced by femtosecond laser pulses,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 452749, 4 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. C. H. Li and G. P. Peterson, “Experimental and numerical study on the cold start performance of a single PEM fuel cell,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 403816, 11 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. V. Gurau and J. A. Mann Jr., “A continuum model for water transport in the ionomer-phase of catalyst coated membranes for PEMFCs,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 372795, 16 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. Q. J. Kang, M. R. Wang, P. P. Mukherjee, and P. C. Lichtner, “Mesoscopic modeling of multiphysicochemical transport phenomena in porous media,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 142879, 11 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. V. Sajith, C. B. Sobhan, and G. P. Peterson, “Experimental investigations on the effects of cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additives on biodiesel,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 581407, 6 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. S. M. Thompson and H. B. Ma, “Effect of localized heating on three dimensional flat-plate oscillating heat pipe,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 465153, 10 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. S. Torii, “Turbulent heat transfer behavior of nanofluid in a circular tube heated under constant heat flux,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 917612, 7 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. Z. Y. Guo, W. Q. Tao, and R. K. Shah, “The field synergy (coordination) principle and its applications in enhancing single phase convective heat transfer,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 48, no. 9, pp. 1797–1807, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  9. W. Q. Tao, Z. Y. Guo, and B. X. Wang, “Field synergy principle for enhancing convective heat transfer—its extension and numerical verifications,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 45, no. 18, pp. 3849–3856, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. Z. Y. Guo, D. Y. Li, and B. X. Wang, “A novel concept for convective heat transfer enhancement,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 41, no. 14, pp. 2221–2225, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  11. W. Q. Tao, Y. L. He, Q. W. Wang, Z. G. Qu, and F. Q. Song, “A unified analysis on enhancing single phase convective heat transfer with field synergy principle,” International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 45, no. 24, pp. 4871–4879, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. Q. Chen, M. R. Wang, and Z. Y. Guo, “Field synergy principle for energy conservation analysis and application,” Advances in Mechanical Engineering, vol. 2010, Article ID 129313, 9 pages, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar