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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 851927, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/851927
Research Article

Estimate of the Arctic Convective Boundary Layer Height from Lidar Observations: A Case Study

1Institute for Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, 00133 Rome, Italy
2ENEA UTA, Santa Maria di Galeria, 00123 Rome, Italy
3Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, 14473 Potsdam, Germany

Received 16 November 2011; Revised 18 January 2012; Accepted 19 January 2012

Academic Editor: Igor N. Esau

Copyright © 2012 L. Di Liberto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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