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Advances in Meteorology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 904571, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/904571
Research Article

Impacts of Aerosol Particle Size Distribution and Land Cover Land Use on Precipitation in a Coastal Urban Environment Using a Cloud-Resolving Mesoscale Model

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY 10031, USA

Received 22 July 2013; Revised 22 September 2013; Accepted 1 December 2013; Published 14 January 2014

Academic Editor: George A. Isaac

Copyright © 2014 Nathan Hosannah and Jorge E. Gonzalez. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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