About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Advances in Materials Science and Engineering
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 650574, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/650574
Research Article

Attachment and Proliferation of Osteoblasts on Lithium-Hydroxyapatite Composites

1Department of Morphology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
3Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Engineering, Marmara University, Goztepe Campus, Kadikoy, 34722 Istanbul, Turkey
4Department of Medical Imaging Techniques, School of Health Related Professions, Marmara University, Haydarpasa Campus, Uskudar, 34668 Istanbul, Turkey
5Nanotechnology and Biomaterials Application and Research Centre, Marmara University, Goztepe Campus, Kadikoy, 34722 Istanbul, Turkey
6Marmara University, Goztepe Campus, Kadikoy, 34722 Istanbul, Turkey
7I3N-Aveiro-Physic Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
8Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

Received 7 November 2011; Accepted 2 February 2012

Academic Editor: Jinlong Yang

Copyright © 2012 Ana Paula M. Shainberg et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The biocompatibility and bioactivity properties of hydroxyapatites (HAs) modified through lithium addition were investigated. Hydroxyapatites obtained from bovine bone were mixed with lithium carbonate (Li), in the proportions of 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, and 2.00% wt, and sintered at 900°, 1000°, 1100°, 1200°, and 1300°C, creating LiHA samples. The osteoblast culture behavior was assessed in the presence of these LiHA compositions. The cellular interactions were analyzed by evaluating the viability and cellular proliferation, ALP production and collagen secretion. The cytotoxic potential was investigated through measurement of apoptosis and necrosis induction. The process of cellular attachment in the presence of the product of dissolution of LiHA, was evaluated trough fluorescence analysis. The physical characteristics of these materials and their cellular interactions were examined with SEM and EDS. The results of this study indicate that the LiHA ceramics are biocompatible and have variable bioactivities, which can be tailored by different combinations of the concentration of lithium carbonate and the sintering temperature. Our findings suggest that LiHA 0.25% wt, sintered at 1300°C, combines the necessary physical and structural qualities with favorable biocompatibility characteristics, achieving a bioactivity that seems to be adequate for use as a bone implant material.