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Advances in Physical Chemistry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 268124, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/268124
Review Article

Exploring Multiple Potential Energy Surfaces: Photochemistry of Small Carbonyl Compounds

1The Hakubi Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8302, Japan
2Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8103, Japan
3Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192, Japan
4Department of Chemistry and The Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA

Received 20 June 2011; Accepted 9 August 2011

Academic Editor: Xinchuan Huang

Copyright © 2012 Satoshi Maeda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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