Table 3: Association of vaccination beliefs with Internet use as a source of vaccine information among parents of school aged children.

Key beliefs (agree or strongly agree)Internet used as a source of vaccine information Unadjusted OR
(95% CI)
Adjusted OR* (95% CI)
Yes ( )No ( )
(%) (%)

Children should only be immunized against serious diseases152 (62.6%)577 (60.4%)1.10 (0.82–1.47)1.07 (0.79–1.44)
Children get more immunizations than are good for them139 (59.9%)246 (27.3%)3.97 (2.94–5.37)2.88 (2.03–4.10)
I am concerned that children’s immune system could be weakened by too many immunizations140 (61.1%)331 (38.7%)2.50 (1.85–3.37)1.74 (1.25–2.43)
I am more likely to trust immunizations that have been around for a while180 (73.5%)765 (78.6%)0.75 (0.55–1.04)1.03 (0.73–1.46)
Immunizations are one of the safest forms of medicine ever developed61 (26.3%)350 (39.7%)0.54 (0.39–0.75)0.73 (0.52–1.03)
Immunizations are getting better and safer all of the time, as a result of medical research107 (46.5%)526 (62.0%)0.53 (0.40–0.71)0.75 (0.54–1.03)
Vaccines strengthen the immune system65 (29.3%)358 (46.0%)0.49 (0.35–0.67)0.65 (0.46–0.92)
It is better for a child to develop immunity by getting sick than to get a vaccine68 (29.8%)150 (16.7%)2.12 (1.52–2.96)1.31 (0.90–1.91)
Healthy children do not need immunizations43 (17.6%)52 (5.8%)3.75 (2.43–5.77)2.06 (1.28–3.31)
Immunizations do more harm than good56 (23.7%)66 (7.0%)4.16 (2.82–6.15)2.47 (1.60–3.81)
I am opposed to immunization requirements because they go against freedom of choice90 (36.6%)134 (13.8%)3.61 (2.63–4.95)2.36 (1.64–3.39)
I am opposed to immunization requirements because parents know what is best for their children56 (23.0%)64 (6.5%)4.26 (2.88–6.30)2.68 (1.75–4.09)
Immunization requirements protect children from getting diseases from unimmunized children114 (48.5%)690 (74.8%)0.32 (0.24–0.43)0.44 (0.32–0.60)
Parents should be allowed to send their children to school even if not vaccinated141 (58.3%)286 (30.2%)3.23 (2.41–4.32)2.21 (1.59–3.07)

Who benefits from vaccination (moderate or great deal of benefit)
The child 160 (68.4%)849 (90.2%)0.23 (0.17–0.33)0.39 (0.25–0.59)
The community—family, child’s playmates, people in the child’s neighborhood152 (65.0%)792 (84.7%)0.33 (0.24–0.46)0.53 (0.36–0.76)
The doctor120 (56.1%)460 (56.0%)1.00 (0.74–1.36)1.06 (0.78–1.45)
The government117 (58.8%)448 (59.6%)0.97 (0.70–1.33)0.98 (0.70–1.35)
The companies that make vaccines219 (92.4%)807 (89.7%)1.40 (0.83–2.37)1.17 (0.68–2.01)

*Adjusted for exemption status.
Counts presented represent the count of non-missing data, and the corresponding percentage is the percent of respondents in each Internet usage group with non-missing data that indicated that a given information source was a “Good or excellent source.” Missing data were not consistent over information source. Odds ratios are calculated based on non-missing results through unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression.