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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 182671, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/182671
Review Article

Central Dopaminergic System and Its Implications in Stress-Mediated Neurological Disorders and Gastric Ulcers: Short Review

1Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Qassim University, P.O. BOX 6655, Buraidah 51452, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, Qassim University, P.O. BOX 6655, Buraidah 51452, Saudi Arabia

Received 6 July 2012; Revised 11 August 2012; Accepted 14 August 2012

Academic Editor: Mustafa F. Lokhandwala

Copyright © 2012 Naila Rasheed and Abdullah Alghasham. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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