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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 416864, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/416864
Review Article

Mechanisms Underlying Tolerance after Long-Term Benzodiazepine Use: A Future for Subtype-Selective G A B A A Receptor Modulators?

1Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences and Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584CG Utrecht, The Netherlands
2Department of Psychiatry, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
3Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Received 7 July 2011; Revised 10 October 2011; Accepted 2 November 2011

Academic Editor: John Atack

Copyright © 2012 Christiaan H. Vinkers and Berend Olivier. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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