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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 708428, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/708428
Review Article

Perisynaptic GABA Receptors: The Overzealous Protector

Departments of Anatomy and Psychology, University of Otago, P.O. Box 913, Dunedin 9013, New Zealand

Received 13 April 2011; Accepted 12 December 2011

Academic Editor: John Atack

Copyright © 2012 Andrew N. Clarkson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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