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Advances in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 862625, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/862625
Research Article

Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Leaf Methanol Extract of Cotyledon orbiculata L. (Crassulaceae)

Discipline of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535, South Africa

Received 30 August 2011; Revised 9 October 2011; Accepted 10 October 2011

Academic Editor: Esra Küpeli Akkol

Copyright © 2012 George J. Amabeoku and Joseph Kabatende. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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