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Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 409156, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/409156
Research Article

Widespread Disulfide Bonding in Proteins from Thermophilic Archaea

1UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 17 May 2011; Accepted 16 July 2011

Academic Editor: M. Adams

Copyright © 2011 Julien Jorda and Todd O. Yeates. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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