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Arthritis
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 239310, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/239310
Review Article

Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Department of Immunology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 6446, Tehran 14155, Iran

Received 21 July 2012; Revised 26 September 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editor: Peter M. van der Kraan

Copyright © 2012 Mohammad Javad Fattahi and Abbas Mirshafiey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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