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Advances in Urology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 404581, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/404581
Review Article

Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

1Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2E1
2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2B7

Received 15 April 2012; Accepted 5 June 2012

Academic Editor: Nan-Haw Chow

Copyright © 2012 Kyle G. Potts et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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