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Advances in Urology
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 932481, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/932481
Research Article

The Relationship between ALA16VAL Single Gene Polymorphism and Renal Cell Carcinoma

1Department of Urology, Gaziosmanpasa University Medical Faculty, Tokat 60100, Turkey
2Department of Biochemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University Medical Faculty, Tokat 60100, Turkey
3Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Medical Faculty, Sakarya University, Turkey

Received 29 June 2013; Accepted 2 December 2013; Published 23 January 2014

Academic Editor: Axel S. Merseburger

Copyright © 2014 Dogan Atilgan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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