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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 505393, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/505393
Research Article

Unique Theory of Mind Differentiation in Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

1Department of Education, Dartmouth College, 6103 Raven House, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
2Office of Academic Affairs, The City University of New York, 535 East 80th Street, NY 10021, USA

Received 30 September 2011; Accepted 18 January 2012

Academic Editor: Bennett L. Leventhal

Copyright © 2012 Michele Tine and Joan Lucariello. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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