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Autism Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 652408, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/652408
Research Article

Atypical Functional Connectivity of the Amygdala in Childhood Autism Spectrum Disorders during Spontaneous Attention to Eye-Gaze

1Department of Psychology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA
2Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010, USA

Received 6 March 2012; Revised 2 November 2012; Accepted 12 November 2012

Academic Editor: Klaus-Peter Ossenkopp

Copyright © 2012 Eric R. Murphy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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