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Advances in Virology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 131457, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/131457
Review Article

Viral Infection: An Evolving Insight into the Signal Transduction Pathways Responsible for the Innate Immune Response

1University of Medicine and Health Sciences, St. Kitts, New York, NY 10001, USA
2Division of Infectious Disease and Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA

Received 7 February 2012; Accepted 21 June 2012

Academic Editor: Julia G. Prado

Copyright © 2012 Girish J. Kotwal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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