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Advances in Virology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 524743, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/524743
Review Article

Orthopoxvirus Genes That Mediate Disease Virulence and Host Tropism

1Department of Genomic Research, State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region 630559, Russia
2Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090, Russia

Received 24 January 2012; Accepted 31 May 2012

Academic Editor: John Frater

Copyright © 2012 Sergei N. Shchelkunov. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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