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Advances in Virology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 640894, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/640894
Review Article

Retrovirus Entry by Endocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases

1Department of AIDS Research, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
2Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
3Pathogen Genomic Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 208-0011, Japan
4Department of Microbiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597

Received 9 August 2012; Revised 14 October 2012; Accepted 6 November 2012

Academic Editor: Jason Mercer

Copyright © 2012 Yoshinao Kubo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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