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Advances in Virology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 826301, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/826301
Review Article

Productive Entry Pathways of Human Rhinoviruses

1Department of Pathophysiology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria
2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Vienna Biocenter, Medical University of Vienna, Dr. Bohr Gasse 9/3, 1030 Vienna, Austria

Received 11 August 2012; Accepted 18 October 2012

Academic Editor: Jason Mercer

Copyright © 2012 Renate Fuchs and Dieter Blaas. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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