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Bone Marrow Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 353878, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/353878
Review Article

Paracrine Molecules of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

Life Science Division, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University , Shenzhen L406A, China

Received 31 May 2011; Revised 26 July 2011; Accepted 26 July 2011

Academic Editor: Joseph H. Antin

Copyright © 2011 Tian Li and Yaojiong Wu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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