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Bone Marrow Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 270425, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/270425
Review Article

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development, Niches, and Signaling Pathways

1Stem Cell Therapy and Transplantation Research Group, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand
2School of Microbiology, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand

Received 9 March 2012; Revised 30 May 2012; Accepted 13 June 2012

Academic Editor: Amanda C. LaRue

Copyright © 2012 Kamonnaree Chotinantakul and Wilairat Leeanansaksiri. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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