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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 24038, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/24038
Research Article

Heme Deficiency in Alzheimer's Disease: A Possible Connection to Porphyria

1Research Service (151), VA Medical ' Regional Office Center, White River Junction, 05009, VT, USA
2Department of Medicine (Neurology), Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover 03755, NH, USA
3Institute of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland 44106, OH, USA

Received 1 December 2005; Revised 30 March 2006; Accepted 5 April 2006

Copyright © 2006 Barney E. Dwyer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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