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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 39508, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/39508
Review Article

Targeting Gonadotropins: An Alternative Option for Alzheimer Disease Treatment

1Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Departament de Fisiologia, Facultat de Farmacia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona 08028, Spain
3School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin and William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Administration, Madison, WI 53705, USA
4Voyager Pharmaceutical Corporation, Raleigh, NC 27615, USA

Received 5 January 2006; Revised 10 May 2006; Accepted 28 June 2006

Copyright © 2006 Gemma Casadesus et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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