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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 58406, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/58406
Review Article

β-Amyloid Degradation and Alzheimer's Disease

1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705, USA
2Departments of Pathology (Neuropathology) and Neuroscience, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA
3Waisman Center for Developmental Disabilities, School of Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53705, USA

Received 18 November 2005; Revised 18 January 2006; Accepted 1 February 2006

Copyright © 2006 Deng-Shun Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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