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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 62079, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/62079
Review Article

Signaling, Polyubiquitination, Trafficking, and Inclusions: Sequestosome 1/p62's Role in Neurodegenerative Disease

Program in Cell & Molecular Biosciences, Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA

Received 30 November 2005; Revised 20 February 2006; Accepted 27 February 2006

Copyright © 2006 Marie W. Wooten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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