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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2006 (2006), Article ID 70414, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/JBB/2006/70414
Mini-Review Article

Screening Pesticides for Neuropathogenicity

Health Effects Division (7509C), Office of Pesticide Programs, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington DC 20460, USA

Received 1 December 2005; Revised 18 May 2006; Accepted 30 May 2006

Copyright © 2006 John D. Doherty. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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