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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 102758, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/102758
Review Article

TAA Polyepitope DNA-Based Vaccines: A Potential Tool for Cancer Therapy

Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier, 00133, Rome, Italy

Received 20 January 2010; Accepted 27 April 2010

Academic Editor: Kim Klonowski

Copyright © 2010 Roberto Bei and Antonio Scardino. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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