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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 262609, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/262609
Review Article

Similarity and Diversity in Macrophage Activation by Nematodes, Trematodes, and Cestodes

Institute of Immunology & Infection Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK

Received 15 September 2009; Accepted 7 October 2009

Academic Editor: Luis I. Terrazas

Copyright © 2010 Stephen J. Jenkins and Judith E. Allen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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