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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 357412, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/357412
Review Article

The Role of Apolipoprotein E in Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis

1Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, 130021, Changchun, China
2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86, Stockholm, Sweden

Received 12 October 2009; Accepted 20 December 2009

Academic Editor: Don Mark Estes

Copyright © 2010 Hong-liang Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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