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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 596432, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/596432
Review Article

Strategies for Cancer Vaccine Development

Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 13 January 2010; Accepted 17 May 2010

Academic Editor: Zhengguo Xiao

Copyright © 2010 Matteo Vergati et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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