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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 641757, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/641757
Review Article

Regulation of the Induction and Function of Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes by Natural Killer T Cell

Department of Informative Clinical Medicine, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City 501-1194, Japan

Received 29 November 2009; Revised 14 February 2010; Accepted 9 March 2010

Academic Editor: Kim Klonowski

Copyright © 2010 Hiroyasu Ito and Mitsuru Seishima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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