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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 726045, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/726045
Review Article

Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

1Programa Institucional de Biomedicina Molecular, ENMyH-IPN, Guillermo, Massieu Helguera, No. 239, Fracc. La Escalera, Ticomán, CP 07320 México, Mexico
2Departamento de Infectómica y Patogénesis Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, A.P. 14-740 México, DF 07000, Mexico

Received 31 July 2009; Revised 10 November 2009; Accepted 8 January 2010

Academic Editor: Luis I. Terrazas

Copyright © 2010 Consuelo Gomez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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