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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 743758, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/743758
Review Article

Parasitic Helminths: New Weapons against Immunological Disorders

Department of Immunology and Parasitology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan

Received 27 July 2009; Accepted 25 November 2009

Academic Editor: Luis I. Terrazas

Copyright © 2010 Yoshio Osada and Tamotsu Kanazawa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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