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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 860160, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/860160
Research Article

Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

1Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Center for Cancer Immunology Research, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Department of Veterinary Sciences, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, Bastrop, TX 78602, USA
4Department of Immunology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 21 November 2009; Accepted 2 March 2010

Academic Editor: Hanchun Yang

Copyright © 2010 Hong Qin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INF ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.