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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 129383, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/129383
Review Article

Physiological Roles of Class I HDAC Complex and Histone Demethylase

Laboratory for Chromatin Dynamics, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, 2-2-3 Minatojima-minamimachi, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047, Japan

Received 15 July 2010; Accepted 7 September 2010

Academic Editor: Minoru Yoshida

Copyright © 2011 Tomohiro Hayakawa and Jun-ichi Nakayama. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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