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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 203628, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/203628
Review Article

The Structural Basis of Ligand Recognition by Natural Killer Cell Receptors

Structural Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunogenetics, NIAID, NIH, 12441 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD 20852, USA

Received 7 February 2011; Accepted 14 March 2011

Academic Editor: John E. Coligan

Copyright © 2011 M. Gordon Joyce and Peter D. Sun. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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