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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 283013, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/283013
Review Article

BACs as Tools for the Study of Genomic Imprinting

Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK

Received 20 May 2010; Revised 20 July 2010; Accepted 19 October 2010

Academic Editor: Noelle E. Cockett

Copyright © 2011 S. J. Tunster et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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