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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 350131, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/350131
Review Article

Modeling Neurological Disorders by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Embryo Technology and Stem Cell Research Center, School of Biotechnology, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand

Received 11 July 2011; Accepted 6 October 2011

Academic Editor: Ken-ichi Isobe

Copyright © 2011 Tanut Kunkanjanawan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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